THE WORLD OF WINE AND SPIRITS

The World of Wine & Spirits from HEMANT SINGH

Beverages are potable drinks which have thirst-quenching, refreshing, stimulating and nourishing qualities. By refreshing, one means the replenishment of fluid loss from the body due to perspiration. Simulation results in increase of the heart beat and blood pressure. This is due to the intake of spirits (alcohol) or tea (thein) and coffee (coffein). Nourishment is provided by the nutrients in the beverages, especially fruit juices. Most of the beverages supply energy in the form of sugar or
alcohol. They also provide other nutrients like mineral salts and vitamins. For example, milk gives calcium and citrus fruits give vitamin C.
Generally, people drink for one or more of six reasons; to quench thirst, to get drunk, to enjoy a social setting (social drinking), to enjoy the taste of the beverage, to feed an addiction (alcoholism), or as part of a religious or traditional ceremony or custom (proposing toast).

Made in “Sparkling” India

Moet-Hennessy has launched a new line of sparkling wine grown and produced in India in a bid to create a new “consumption culture” among young, affluent and sophisticated Indians. 
The French wines and spirits house is launching an aggressive marketing campaign for ‘Chandon Nashik’ in a country where wine consumption is still low and the potential for growth very high, said Mark Bedingham of Moet-Hennessy Asia Pacific, in an interview with Harpers.co.uk.
Produced in the Nashik region of western India, the home-grown bubbly benefits from the drier, more moderate temperatures of the area which is located inland and at a higher altitude, he told the publication.
The Chandon Brut is a mix of Chenin Blanc, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir and is described as having a fresh aroma and “subtle complexity.” The Rosé, made from Shiraz, is ripe with red fruit aromas and a full flavoured palate.
The luxury brand’s marketing strategy, meanwhile, is to catch both the demographic and the wine market while they’re still young. That means engendering brand loyalty among young, cosmopolitan and social Indian consumers while the wine-sipping culture is just beginning to find its feet.
Chandon Nashik India is rolling out in wine shops, restaurants, bars, hotels and nightclubs across the country

CHAMPAGNE COUPE MOULDED FROM KATE MOSS’S BREAST LAUNCHED

English supermodel Kate Moss’s left breast has been immortalised in a Champagne coupe designed by painter Lucian Freud’s daughter.
Taking Marie Antoinette as her inspiration, whose left breast was said to have served as the model for the first Champagne coupe in the late-18th century, British artist Jane McAdam Freud crafted the coupe from a mould of Moss’s left breast.
The glass has an elongated, slender stem, while the outside of the bowl features an intricate Art Deco-inspired pattern and the base bears the model’s signature.
“I was excited to participate in this project – what an honour to be alongside Marie Antoinette, she was a very intriguing and mischievous character,” Moss said.
“Champagne is always associated with celebration and happy occasions and I had fun creating this beautiful coupe,” she added.
McAdam Freud was commissioned by 34 Restaurant in London’s Mayfair to create the coupe in honour of Moss’s 40th birthday and to mark her 25-year milestone in the fashion business.
The second release of the Champagne house’s 1998 vintage will be paired to a “seasonal menu” created by 34’s head chef, Harvey Ayliffe.
The coupes will be in use at 34 and sister Caprice Holdings restaurants The Ivy, Daphne’s and Scott’s, all of which are owned by restaurateur Richard Caring.
Moss is no stranger to artistic collaborations – she posed for late painter Lucian Freud in 2003 while pregnant with her daughter Lila Grace.
Three years later Moss modelled for sculptor Marc Quinn on Sphinx, a life-sized sculpture of Moss in a yoga position with her hands and feet behind her head.
This is also not the first reinterpretation of the Marie Antoinette coupe. In 2008 Chanel’s creative director Karl Lagerfeld collaborated with Dom Pérignon on a Champagne coupe inspired by his muse, Claudia Schiffer’s bosom.
Sold with bottles of 1995 Oenothèque, the coupes cost £2,123.
Courtesy:http://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/

VINTAGE CHAMPAGNE

Non-Vintage champagne makes up about 80% of all champagne made. By law, these champagnes must age for one year in the bottle. Almost all champagnes are blended and often from the wines of more than one harvest. Vintage  champagnes are produced occasionally in a particularly good grape growing year. When this happens, only the grapes from that year are used and the champagne becomes the vintage one. The year appears on the bottle label and the cork.
The Vintage Champagne may be a blend but from the same year. However, in order to be declared a vintage Champagne by law, it must be matured for a minimum of one year and then be aged in the bottle for a minimum of five years.